Tag Archive: Google


Everything you need to get high rankings on Google. Proven, reliable and tested:

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 SEOprofiler offers sophisticated tools that help you to get your website on top of Google’s search results:

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Powerful web page optimization tools help you to improve the rankings of your web pages on the result pages.
Up-to-date link building and link management tools that are fully compliant with the requirements of Google deliver more visitors to your website.
Comprehensive keyword research tools that help you to find the best terms for your business.
Full integration with Twitter and other social media sites enables you to protect your online reputation.
Next-generation website audit tool that automatically scans your web pages for potential problems.
Competitive intelligence tools that enable you to spy on the SEO campaigns of your competitors. SEOprofiler also offers a link disinfection tool.

Search engine optimization tools
Track your results

 

 

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SEOprofiler helps you to track the results of your search engines optimization activities:

Find out how your website is ranked for your keywords on Google, Bing and Yahoo in 68 countries.
Get actionable items so that you can invest your time as efficiently as possible.
Opportunities and alerts help you to locate the keywords that will deliver the best results.
Integrates with Google Analytics for detailed website analytics.

Custom SEO reports in your company design
Impress your boss and your clients

SEOprofiler enables you to create beautiful reports in your company design for your boss and your clients. Make a good impression:

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Fully customizable with your own logo, colors, headers and footers, etc.
You can send custom PDF reports, or you can offer your customers web-based reports.
The reports have no reference to SEOprofiler.
Your clients won’t find out that you use SEOprofiler to create the reports.

 

Try SEOprofiler now for FREE!

“There’s no better way to outplay your competitors.”

Read what other people say about SEOprofiler:

“SEOprofiler.com is a site that will make any webmaster’s day. There’s no better way to outplay your competitors.”
Review on KillerStartups.com

“I was recently searching for a reliable backlink report source and came across SEOprofiler. And, boy, am I glad I did! Not only was their site easy to use, but the intelligence it offered by way of its comprehensive report was worth it! ”
John Muehling, MobileHealthCareToday.com

“SEOprofiler was the exact tool I was looking for. I tried about 10 other tools that tried to do what SEOprofiler did 100 times better. After analyzing the data from the reports I made a few simple tweaks to my site and I moved up to the front page of Google.”
Greg Tampa, GregTampa.com

 

“SEOprofiler is great for site owners who are serious about their SEO efforts.”
Jeremy Moore, PCRepairShop.org

“One of the best things about SEOprofiler is the way it combines so many effective and essential SEO tools into one convenient location. With SEOprofiler, the expert can get everything he needs without having to run all over the place and the beginner can be sure he isn’t forgetting anything.

SEOprofiler is perfectly suited for managers, owners, and administrators of web sites who need to increase traffic to their sites. As far as SEO tools go, you would be hard pressed to find a more professional and more comprehensive one than SEOprofiler. We heartily give it a good four and a half stars out of five.”

Review on SEOsoftware.net

“Thanks for creating a great backlink manager tool. I was just using the one on [competitor] and their tool is far more limited and cumbersome. It dawned on me as I got frustrated that I should try your option. And it’s about to save me hours of work. So thank you!”
Eddy Salomon, InternetMarketingSmarts.com

“I was blown away by the simplicity of use, and information being given out.”
Jordan Kovats, TheSeoGuys.ca

“SEOprofiler is a great tool. I started using it a week ago and I find that the tools are high quality.”
Paolo Cappucci, Webhorizons.it

“ SEOprofiler has taken several very effective SEO tools and made them all available in one place. It is a powerful collection of tools for those seeking to optimize website traffic. […] Web site owners and managers who want to make use of SEO to increase traffic to their sites will benefit from SEOprofiler. ”
Review on AppAppeal.com

“I definitely believe my SEO efforts are more focused since using SEOprofiler.”
Linsey Knerl, 1099mom.com

“SEOprofiler is a cool service that allows you to get a lot of information about your competitors’ backlinks, rankings and AdWords ads.”
Nicola Deiana, the3dtechnologies.com

“I wanted to let you all know what a great product you have created. My company places permanent dentists in the United States and we were looking for a something to help us with search engine optimization.

We found your program online and have been very impressed with what it has done for us so far and how easy it is to use. We immediately took the programs recommendations for internal website changes and that has moved us up 30 spots for the search term we were looking for. […]

SEO profiler is very well thought out and well done. Your staff deserves praise, because it is simple and easy to use and allows anyone to improve their rankings. I want to thank you for what you have created and let you know I plan to continue with you all in the future. Thanks again and great job!”
Jeremy LaPine, CEO, BlueJayStaffing.com

“SEOprofiler […] can substantially improve a company’s SEO campaigns. In addition, the program offers detailed, aesthetically pleasing reporting features that are useful for displaying data generated by this software suite.”
Entrepreneur.com on NBCnews.com

 

Try SEOprofiler now for FREE!

More than 50,000 small and large businesses use SEOprofiler to get high rankings on Google.

 

customerlist2g

 Google is promising a multitude of uses for the 
Android Wear.

(Credit: Google) 

Google is dipping its toes into the wearables world with
 Android Wear.
In a blog post on Tuesday, the Internet titan unwrapped the
 details of a modified version of its mobile Android operating
 system. The OS will be heavily based on its Google Now 
voice-recognition technology, and is designed to be applied
 to wearables, with the initial push with smartwatches. 
Google also introduced LG, Asus, HTC, Motorola, and 
Samsung as hardware partners to utilize Android Wear,
 and Broadcom, Imagination, INtel, Mediatek and 
Qualcomm as chip partners. The Fossil Group will
 bring Android Wear-powered watches later this year.
CNET previously reported that Google would release 
the details of its smartwatch-centric OS in March. The 
report also noted LG and Google would unveil a smartwatch 
at the Google I/O developer conference, and a person 
briefed on the matter confirmed that LG would indeed
 be the first partner to have its smartwatch go on sale. 

 

 

Roger Cheng is an executive editor for CNET News. Prior to this, 
he was on the telecommunications beat and wrote 
for Dow Jones Newswires and The Wall Street Journal
 for nearly a decade. He’s a devoted Trojan alum and 
 Los Angeles Lakers fan.

Google can’t get any of us to use Google Plus, but they’re still trying. And they’re pushing hard. One of the reasons I love blogging is, for good or evil, I don’t need any evidence for anything I say. With that caveat, Google’s closing in on its goal of being federated across all of its properties, so be acutely aware. They’re triangulating us all and will soon be able to identify not merely what “you” — someone like you, a demographic generality — want, need, and desire, but what you, yourself, (or me, Chris Abraham), want in particular, down to, at most, your person (and the maximum 7.8 square meters around you).

Rejoice! I am not longer 35–44-year-old white, college-educated, man, living in Metro Washington, I am 43-year-old, soon to be 44, Christopher James Abraham, who lives between Columbia Heights and Arlington Views off of Columbia Pike in South Arlington, VA, who owns guns, motorcycles, spends money on eBay and Amazon, and loves eating fish tacos at Taqueria el Poblano during their weekday happy hour from 4-7pm — and many other very specific details of my life (like the fact that I attended the Nation’s Gun Show at the Dulles Expo Center over the weekend).

 

Learn & Read More:

 

 

  • chrisabraham-photo
  • Chris Abraham
  • Chris Abraham is a leading expert in digital: social media marketing, Internet privacy, online reputation management (ORM), and digital PR with a focus on blogger outreach, blogger engagement, and Internet crisis response.

    A pioneer in online social networks and publishing, with a natural facility for anticipating the next big thing, Chris is an Internet analyst, web strategy consultant and advisor to the industries’ leading firms. He specializes in Web 2.0 technologies, including content syndication, online collaboration, blogging, and consumer generated media. Chris Abraham was named a Top 50 Social Media Power Influencer by Forbes, #1 PR2.0 Influencer by Traackr, and top-10 social media influencers by Marketwire; and, for what it’s worth, Chris has a Klout of 78 the last time he looked.

    Chris is currently Director of Social Media at Unison agency, where he is expanding their social media offerings by starting a social media practice. Unison is an integrated brand agency combining strategic, creative, and technology services to help their clients build and strengthen their brands.

    Chris recently completed a five-month contract with Reputation.com as Team Lead, Special Projects, in sales for their “Whale Hunting” team. Chris was one of two whale hunters tasked with closing clients for their high-end Picasso Online Reputation Management (ORM) and Executive Privacy products, from $10,000-$100,000/month campaigns for high-net-worth and high-profile individuals and Fortune 500 companies.

    Prior to Reputation.com, Chris ran his own digital PR and marketing company, Abraham Harrison, LLC, from Washington, DC, Portland, Oregon, and Berlin, Germany, with clients including: Kimberly Clark, The Daily, Habitat for Humanity, Greenpeace, The Fresh Air Fund, International Medical Corps, Sharp, Pew, Alzheimer’s Association, and others. Previous to starting AH, Chris worked on the Interactive Team at Edelman Public Affairs in Washington, DC, consulting with clients such as Wal-Mart, Shell, and GE on blogger and social media strategy. Before Edelman, Chris was Technology Strategist for New Media Strategies, a pioneer in online brand promotion and protection with clients including Sci-Fi Channel, Buena Vista, TomTom, Paramount Pictures, Coca-Cola, McDonalds, Disney, Reebok, EA, RCA, and NBC.

    In the early nineties, Chris joined The Meta Network, a seminal online virtual community based in Washington, and so began his career as an expert in online community development, social media, social networking, and online collaboration. Chris has had a web presence since 1993 and started blogging in 1999, focusing on community, connection, innovation, and brand extension. As a technologist, Chris has consulted T. Rowe Price, the US Department of Treasury CIO, Friendster, Deutsche Telekom, and others.

    Chris has taught blogging courses for the Writer’s Center of Bethesda, has been a guest lecturer on public affairs blogging at Columbia University’s SIPA school and the American University in Washington, DC, the Emergent Technologies Advisor to the Urban Institute’s Communications Advisory Board, and a Renaissance Weekend participant since 2001. Additionally, he is the go-to expert on social media, citizen journalism, technology, and the Internet for BBC World Service, CNN Radio, and CNet’s BNet.

    Chris received his BA in American Literature from The George Washington University, studied American Literature at the University of East Anglia in Norwich, England, studied French at the University of Hawaii, and studied German at both the Washington and Berlin Goethe-Instituts. In addition to the Huffington Post, Chris blogs for his own blog, ChrisAbraham.com, for Biznology.com, for Socialmedia.biz, and for MarketingConversation.com. Chris has written for AdAge’s DigitalNext and Global Idea Network blogs.

    Chris is indulging his mid-life crisis by buying a motorcycle and taking up the shooting sports including trap and target shooting with both rifle and pistol. Until he gets the novelty of gun ownership out of his system, you’ll find Chris in South Arlington, Virginia, right across the river from his beloved Washington, DC.

    Chris is president of Gerris digtial and director of social media at Unison.

    (Disclosure: I am a former employee of Reputation.com and they continue to sponsor my work)

 

Written by Jason Mick

Whether you are a network engineer Googling a potential product who is weary of vendor follow-up emails or a journalist searching for background information on a topic that might flag you for some kind of government watch list (e.g., my search for the Syrian Electronic Army’s Twitter feed), many of us have wished that search was a little more private. In response, a number of so-called private search engines have arisen, claiming to prevent the sort of information-gathering associated with Google, Bing, or Yahoo searches.   They include Gibiru, DuckDuckGo, Qrobe.it, StartPage, Gigablast, and Zeekly.

To understand what these private searches mean to you and to your company’s privacy and security, you must first consider how they operate. Some, such as StartPage and Gibiru, simply skin an existing search engine (such as Google), routing search requests through its servers. Assuming they’re trustworthy, this is an okay approach. It’s essentially no different from using a virtual proxy network (VPN), but it does afford you a degree of privacy.

 

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PageSpeedService

People are obsessed with SEO — which is weird. Just a few short years ago, SEO was considered snake oil. I have been designing and implementing SEO strategies since the mid-90s when SEO included lots and lots of directory submissions and quite a lot of compassion for people who were stuck on dial-up with PCs that could only deal with small, low-resolution monitors. Now, both online reputation management (ORM), something I have been doing since 2003, and organic search engine optimization are both essential services, though I fear that too few really consider all the variables when they purport to having deep knowledge of the state of the art.

Google-Analytics1This was embarrassingly obvious when I attended Vocus’ Demand Success 2013 conference. Mind you, it was awesome and so worthwhile, but it’s a communications conference and not a tech conference. There were quite a few panels and presentations about SEO, it’s true, but none of the presenters who were discussing search were technologists. Their SEO expertise was limited to content: how to optimize content for Google using linking, surfing Google trends, keyword diversity, as well as a little bit about organization, structure, and maybe something about Google Webmaster Tools — however, you’re never going to get to the top of Google’s Hit Parade if you don’t understand that Google is well-past all the trickery and all the surfing and has finally been able to boil it down to the essentials: users must get what they’re looking for without needing to wait. Needing to wait? Yes. You can have the most perfectly-tooled website, wired for sound and optimized to within an inch of its life, and if the quality of hand-off from Google, which is optimized for speed, to your site, which may well be optimized for content, is slow — meaning your site’s a pig with tons of plug-ins, no caching, and living on an over-taxed shared virtual server in a discount data center that’s nowhere near the backbone of the Internet — then Google will always err on the side of speed — Google knows that all visitors always blame Google for any experience that’s not instantaneous and that it’s almost never Google’s fault — it’s almost always the hand-off to the target site the visitor chooses.

READ MORE AT:

About the author

  • chrisabraham-photo
  • Chris Abraham
  • Chris Abraham is a leading expert in digital: social media marketing, Internet privacy, online reputation management (ORM), and digital PR with a focus on blogger outreach, blogger engagement, and Internet crisis response.A pioneer in online social networks and publishing, with a natural facility for anticipating the next big thing, Chris is an Internet analyst, web strategy consultant and advisor to the industries’ leading firms. He specializes in Web 2.0 technologies, including content syndication, online collaboration, blogging, and consumer generated media. Chris Abraham was named a Top 50 Social Media Power Influencer by Forbes, #1 PR2.0 Influencer by Traackr, and top-10 social media influencers by Marketwire; and, for what it’s worth, Chris has a Klout of 78 the last time he looked.Chris is currently Director of Social Media at Unison agency, where he is expanding their social media offerings by starting a social media practice. Unison is an integrated brand agency combining strategic, creative, and technology services to help their clients build and strengthen their brands.

    Chris recently completed a five-month contract with Reputation.com as Team Lead, Special Projects, in sales for their “Whale Hunting” team. Chris was one of two whale hunters tasked with closing clients for their high-end Picasso Online Reputation Management (ORM) and Executive Privacy products, from $10,000-$100,000/month campaigns for high-net-worth and high-profile individuals and Fortune 500 companies.

    Prior to Reputation.com, Chris ran his own digital PR and marketing company, Abraham Harrison, LLC, from Washington, DC, Portland, Oregon, and Berlin, Germany, with clients including: Kimberly Clark, The Daily, Habitat for Humanity, Greenpeace, The Fresh Air Fund, International Medical Corps, Sharp, Pew, Alzheimer’s Association, and others. Previous to starting AH, Chris worked on the Interactive Team at Edelman Public Affairs in Washington, DC, consulting with clients such as Wal-Mart, Shell, and GE on blogger and social media strategy. Before Edelman, Chris was Technology Strategist for New Media Strategies, a pioneer in online brand promotion and protection with clients including Sci-Fi Channel, Buena Vista, TomTom, Paramount Pictures, Coca-Cola, McDonalds, Disney, Reebok, EA, RCA, and NBC.

    In the early nineties, Chris joined The Meta Network, a seminal online virtual community based in Washington, and so began his career as an expert in online community development, social media, social networking, and online collaboration. Chris has had a web presence since 1993 and started blogging in 1999, focusing on community, connection, innovation, and brand extension. As a technologist, Chris has consulted T. Rowe Price, the US Department of Treasury CIO, Friendster, Deutsche Telekom, and others.

    Chris has taught blogging courses for the Writer’s Center of Bethesda, has been a guest lecturer on public affairs blogging at Columbia University’s SIPA school and the American University in Washington, DC, the Emergent Technologies Advisor to the Urban Institute’s Communications Advisory Board, and a Renaissance Weekend participant since 2001. Additionally, he is the go-to expert on social media, citizen journalism, technology, and the Internet for BBC World Service, CNN Radio, and CNet’s BNet.

    Chris received his BA in American Literature from The George Washington University, studied American Literature at the University of East Anglia in Norwich, England, studied French at the University of Hawaii, and studied German at both the Washington and Berlin Goethe-Instituts. In addition to the Huffington Post, Chris blogs for his own blog, ChrisAbraham.com, for Biznology.com, for Socialmedia.biz, and for MarketingConversation.com. Chris has written for AdAge’s DigitalNext and Global Idea Network blogs.

    Chris is indulging his mid-life crisis by buying a motorcycle and taking up the shooting sports including trap and target shooting with both rifle and pistol. Until he gets the novelty of gun ownership out of his system, you’ll find Chris in South Arlington, Virginia, right across the river from his beloved Washington, DC.

    Chris is president of Gerris digtial and director of social media at Unison.

    (Disclosure: I am a former employee of Reputation.com and they continue to sponsor my work)

If  you are not using Instagram to make some extra cash each month then you are seriously missing out.  Armed  with nothing more than their Instagram account, their mobile phone and their  love for taking pictures, people are turning their passion into cash. And so can you!

Let  me ask you, what would an extra $1,500 a month mean to you? If you are anything  like the people we’ve helped then you’d probably say “$1,500 would be awesome!”

20,000  members have seen the raw power of InstaProfitGram and now we want to invite  you to be part of this “awesome crowd – InstaProfitGram

Joining  this “awesome crowd” is easier than you think too…

I can’t believe I have been uploading my photos  for 15 months and not take advantage of this cash-pulling opportunity. I am  hooked!

Brad H, Miami Florida

InstaProfitGram was created with ease of use in mind. In fact, it is one of the biggest reasons our loyal members praise our system every day. They are just blown away by how easy it is to make money with their Instagram account.

You’ll be amazed at the goldmine you’ve been sitting on. Many members have had their Instagram account for more than a year and are amazed at how quickly we’ve transformed that account into a money-making machine.                 But do you want to know what the best thing is with our system? Fun, fun and more fun!

Instagram is all about doing what you love and sharing it with the world.                 We just add some cash into the mix and let our members carry on doing what they love.

Don’t be surprised if after following our easy step-by-step system you are making $50 a day. That’s what our members make each day, on average.

  • 1.Only 0.002% of Instagram users have tapped this money-making secret (the sooner you start the better!)

  • 2.Instagram is the only social network that gives you the user, a chance to make money from your own content (this alone should excite you)

  • 3.The types of pictures you take don’t matter. Just point, shoot and collect your cash

  • 4.With our system you make money and gain exposure. Millions will see your snaps

  • 5.This is scalable. Imagine what you can do with 2 or 5 photos daily

And  before you start worrying about this being hard, let me put your mind at ease.  There’s nothing hard in this, and when I say nothing I mean exactly that.  Nothing!

With  InstaProfitGram there’s…

No  need to waste countless hours and weeks trying to add followers to your  accounts .

No  need to spend your valuable time trying to get people to like your pictures.

Absolutely  no need at all to create a bad reputation on Instagram spamming other people’s  profiles.

No  need to worry about your location. U.S.A, Canada, UK, France, Germany? InstaProfitGram  is suited for anyone, anywhere. Even people in their 60s are using it.

I was 5 days from having my car repo’ed. Thanks to  InstaProfitGram I now “free and clear.” Glad I found your site.

Terence F, Surrey, UK

To be honest I was sceptical; I really didn’t  want to believe that I could make money from taking pics of my dog. I am a sceptic  no more. Just withdrew $1,688 from my PayPal!

Chris M, Toronto, Canada

I wasn’t a big fan of taking pictures with my  iPhone but after my sister showed me her PayPal account I just had to create an  Instagram account. $798 so far!

Rhonda W, Boise, Idaho

CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE

Image credit: Shutterstock

Image credit: Shutterstock

 

Have you Googled your company lately? If not, you probably should. What  people are saying online about your brand — the good, the bad and the  oftentimes inaccurate — makes all the difference when it comes to winning or  losing customers, says Michael Fertik, founder and chief executive of Redwood  City, Calif.-based online  reputation management agency Reputation.com and co-author of Wild West 2.0: How to Protect and Restore Your Reputation on  the Untamed Social Frontier (AMACOM, 2010).

If you’re not vigilantly monitoring and constantly improving your company’s  online reputation, you could be sending potential customers to competitors who  are. You can’t control what others say about your brand online, but you can  manage how your business generally comes across on the internet with a few  helpful tools, tips and tricks.

Here are 10 vital questions to ask when managing your company’s online  reputation:

1. How can I find out what people are saying about my brand  online? Start by simply searching for your company’s name — and the  names of your products and services — on Google, Yahoo and Bing, and see what  types of information come up. Search using the exact title of your business,  along with common misspellings of it. You’ll also want to run an image search  using your company’s name.

In an ideal world, your business’s actual website, hopefully along with some  favorable, accurate news and reviews, should dominate the majority of the first  page of search engine results, says Michael Zammuto, president of Brand.com, a Philadelphia-based online reputation management  firm.

2. Can I be notified when my company is mentioned online? Thankfully, yes. All you have to do is create a Google Alert. They are free, real-time email alerts that are  automatically sent to your email address when mentions about your company occur  online. You can easily set up multiple keyword-based alerts to notify you when  relevant new web content is published about your products, services and events  and those of your competitors.

3. How does my company’s online reputation stack up to my  competitors’? Fertik says it’s just as crucial to monitor your  competitors’ online reputations as it is to stay on top of your own.

“Pay close attention to what people say your competitors are doing right that  you might not be doing right,” he says, “and what they are doing wrong that you  are doing right.” The idea is to use what you learn about your competitors  online to fill any service gaps and gain a competitive edge.

4. Does my company website represent my business in the best possible  way? Your company’s own website is your first line of defense when  it comes to your online reputation, Zammuto says. Does it contain compelling  brand messaging that clearly demonstrates what your company services or  sells?

More importantly, does your company’s website URL directly mirror your actual  business name (www.companyname.com)? If not, Zammuto says you should immediately  acquire an exact match domain name, if possible, so consumers can easily,  quickly find you online.

5. How can I monitor what people are saying about my business via  social media? If you have your own company Facebook page or Twitter  account, log into each platform daily to track customer questions and comments  and respond to them individually in a timely manner, Zammuto advises.

There are several fee-based social media management tools that you can use if  you don’t have the time to monitor and respond to individual social comments and  interactions about your brand. These include Salesforce.com’s Radian6, Vocus’s Buying Signals and HootSuite.

All three let you track and reply to social mentions based on specific  keywords from a single dashboard. HootSuite offers a 30-day free trial, with  paid plans starting at $8.99 per month. Vocus and Radian6 share their fees via  prearranged sales calls.

6. Should I really care what people say about my company on review  sites? “Word-of-review is now more powerful than word-of-mouth,”  Fertik says, so it’s critical to analyze and understand what people are saying  about your company on review sites that are relevant to your specific line of  business.

For example, if you own a hotel, you’ll want to search for reviews and  ratings of your establishment on sites like TripAdvisor and Hotels.com. If  people are complaining on these types of sites about the cleanliness of your  rooms, view it as an opportunity to swiftly respond with appropriate, corrective  action and to update your brand’s own website messaging to reflect your improved  housekeeping standards, suggests Fertik.

7. What types of positive web content can I create to offset negative  content? Zammuto suggests that you create several different unique  types of web content that highlight your products and services, including a  company blog and a YouTube channel, for starters.

Building up interesting and relevant web content about your company can  increase the likelihood of favorable links appearing on the first page of Google  search results. The basic concept, Zammuto says, is to produce enough positive  search results to minimize any negative ones beleaguering your brand. Suppress  the bad, pump up the good.

8. Should I be concerned about my personal online reputation, too? Yes, especially if you are the product itself, says Fertik. For  example, if you are a doctor or an attorney, you’ll want to be sure that when  people search for your name online they encounter web content about you that is  nothing less than favorable. This includes comments, images and videos that you  post on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram and on your personal blog.  Your personal online persona and image should be “consistent with your  profession enough to boost consumer confidence,” Fertik says.

9. Should I respond to negative reviews? Both Fertik and  Zammuto advise that you don’t waste time responding to excessively negative or  attacking comments on review sites like Yelp.

“The more you engage negative comments on Yelp, the more you’re basically  encouraging Google to drive traffic to those types of controversial  interactions,” Zammuto says.

10. What are some reliable online reputation management tools? For business owners on a shoestring budget, there are a handful of  free, but basic tools to choose from. Addict-o-matic  is one such free tool that delivers the latest online mentions about any topic  or name you look up, including mentions on WordPress blogs, YouTube videos,  Flickr images, Ask.com news and more.

Organizations such as Brand.com, Reputation.com, Integrity Defenders and RemoveYourName offer paid services for businesses that can  help you clean up your online presence. Among other services, they request that  negative online commentary and information about your company be removed and  assist you in developing positive content to take the place of unbecoming  content.

Integrity Defenders offers business packages that start at $1,289 to clear  unwanted information from the first page of search results for a single search  phrase. The company’s advanced business package costs $2,149 and extends the  service from the first page to the second page of search results, also for one  search phrase. Reputation.com’s widely used Reputation Defender product ranges  between approximately $3,000 and $15,000, depending on how customized the  services are, to keep tabs on your online reputation and to get rid of negative  remarks they dig up.

 

 

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Branding,   Reputation management

 

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kim-lachance-shandrow

 

Kim Lachance Shandrow is a Los Angeles-based tech journalist who  specializes in writing about iPhone, BlackBerry, and Android phones, as well as  social media marketing, startups, streaming TV, apps and green  technology.

Jenga blocks

Adblock Plus is a very popular browser extension for both Chrome and Firefox, which automatically blocks web advertising on all websites.

However, Austrian news site Horizont reported that Google, amongst other companies, are paying Adblock Plus (and their parent company Eyeo) in order to ensure that their ads are displayed to those who are using the extension, by being included on their “whitelist” of allowable online advertising.

Adblock Plus, on their website, states that they do charge some companies for the white listing, in order to support the service.

Do companies pay you for being added to the list?

Whitelisting is free for all small websites and blogs. However, managing this list requires significant effort on our side and this task cannot be completely taken over by volunteers as it happens with common filter lists. That’s why we are being paid by some larger properties that serve nonintrusive advertisements that want to participate in the Acceptable Ads initiative.

It isn’t really surprising that Google is paying to the whitelisted. For starters, it is a loss of revenue for Google.

Beyond that, advertisers want to be able to reach the users to utilize extensions such as Adblock Plus, so there is the motivation by Google to ensure that their advertisers are happy and can get their ads displayed in front of the users they want to on the sites they want to.

However, it does start a slippery slope of what kind of fees they will accept for ads to appear even with Adblock Plus in use. For example, if the price is right, would they accept any advertiser who wanted their spammy advertising to appear?

There’s been no word from Adblock Plus or Google so far on the fact Google seems to be paying to be whitelisted.

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Jennifer Slegg

Jennifer Slegg

Search Engine Marketing Consultant

JenniferSlegg.com

Jennifer Slegg began as a freelance writer, and turned to search engine optimization and writing content for the web in 1998. She has created numerous content-rich sites in niche markets and works with many clients on content creation, strategy, and monetization.  She writes about many search industry and social media topics on her blog, JenniferSlegg.com and is a frequent speaker at search industry conferences on SEO, content marketing and content monetization. Acknowledged as the leading expert on the Google AdSense contextual advertising program, she runs JenSense, a blog dealing exclusively with contextual advertising. She is known by many as her handle Jenstar on various webmaster forums.

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I believe that all social media marketing campaigns should probably start with foraging (as I discussed last week) — but as you grow, you need to evolve, especially if you need to bring home more and more food. Social media trappers have figured out how to use hashtags as well as how to generate compelling content with the express purpose of sharing, content that is somewhere else, content that doesn’t live on a social network but, rather, lives on a branded web site, corporate site, blog, or microsite.

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All roads lead to branded content that both highlights capabilities, products, services, case studies, and the mad talent therein via explicit links back, allowing social media trappers to lure their followers and people in their professional or social media space to not only be discovered but to also link away from Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, Google+, and even Tumblr back to where the source content lives.

sharptrapMost trappers these days call themselves “content marketers” and what they do is “content marketing.”

And, if they’re doing their jobs well enough, their goal is to both set their own traps but also to make these traps “contagious” enough that this content is shared, retweeted, reshared, liked, and favorited — essentially like a floor entirely festooned with mousetraps to the point where setting off just one would have the effect of setting them all off.

While most social media trappers, AKA content marketers, write content that is meaningful to them personally, professionally, or in relation to the work they do or have done — their experience; many tend to surf trends.

1112x700They’ll figure out what they want to catch in their trap and then create content — also known as bait — that is most compelling to that audience. The vertical’s catnip, if you will. While this can surely be an authentic pursuit where you use your continued knowledge and understanding of your clientele to create better and better traps — the elusive better mousetrap — this sort of trend-surfing can also be “abused” by ginning up the appeal based on what’s going on in the news, on reddit, on Buzzfeed, or what’s trending on Twitter or Google at the time.

The most successful trappers who are really better at attracting and driving traffic than they are at building long-term trust relationships tend to be the best social media hijackers. They do things such as mis-tagging their social content via mis-categorization or by using hashtags or keywords that are much more popular and timely than they are accurate.

Antique-Trap-AEven though the old reliable “keyword stuffing” from the nascent days of SEO are pretty much deceased, the strategy is still popular with social media trappers.

Even more, the content-creation for content marketing can trend-surf as well.

Since time began — or at least since blogs began (actually before then, newspapers, television, radio, and all the rest are either breaking something new or surfing the wave of interest that results) there has been an entire economy of bloggers who work to create content as quickly as possible in response to breaking news — this is just the natural extension of it. It required fast-and-dirty writing and the willingness to get something out there first and maybe do some editing after.

smallLive2It always benefits a social media trapper if they can secure a place on Google News, the trendiest of all news aggregators on the web.

At the end of the day, however, content marketing is not good enough on its own and neither is trend surfing. At the end of the day, all of these things are just more and more elaborate and compelling lures — it’s all baiting the trap.

What do you have planned for when the trap is sprung? Punji trapping pit? Steel jaw legholds? A snare? Drag noose? Twitch-up? Deadfall? Conibear?

Maybe a catch-and-release cage trap — non-lethal (but you need that meat!) Maybe a glue trap, then. Well, you obviously don’t want to literally trap your prospects, do you? But what is the figurative marketing trap? The email list, of course, a Feedburner RSS subscription, or maybe signing up for a free white paper, a sign-up form, or even just a contact form.

VC126380lOtherwise, everything’s ephemeral. More like signing up for a safari in Africa and bringing your Nikon in lieu of digging elephant-sized holes and covering them up or — better — bringing a .470 Nitro Express elephant gun; however, that’ll take us to hunting and this is about trapping.

One of the downsides of trapping is that most game is too smart for traps; another issue is that traps are mostly good for small- to medium-sized varmints; you’ll also only just get what you get; finally, the trap doesn’t always hold or you might not be able to rush around making sure all your traps are freshly-baited and attended to — it really is a full-time job.

 

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There are many public relations professionals who joined Google+ and share articles and interesting findings on this network. Communities are great places to keep in touch with PR peeps who share the same passion and interests, to exchange ideas, get tips and feel the pulse of the industry.

Below are ten Google+ Communities you should consider joining. They are listed based on the number of members, and  cover a wide range of PR, communications and marketing aspects so that all the PR people on Google+ can find something that meets their interests.

  1. Marketing+ – A Community of Marketers. Mobile Local Social Search PR – has over 1700 members. This community invites its members to “assemble some brilliant minds in marketing and connect… so, we can help marketing NOT suck.” Many interesting articles here!
  2. Public Relations – A place for PR pros to talk about workflow, tools, tips, etc., – it is a community with over 1300 members sharing interesting and useful content in various categories.
  3. Social media – this is a community with over 1300 members. The official presentation mentions that beginners and seasoned pros are all invited to learn from each other.
  4. Online Marketing – A great community to talk about Online Marketing –  with over 1000 members, open for anyone who deals with SEO, PPC, Social Media, Affiliate Marketing, Email Marketing, Display, analytics and any other areas of performance marketing. They also run monthly events for professionals working in the space.
  5. Social media – Discover How To Use Social Media For Your Business! – has almost 900 members and is a social media community devoted to helping businesses and marketers use social media more effectively.
  6. Online Marketing – Where SEO SEM Online Marketing and webmasters meet – is a community with over 600 members discussing SEO, SEM, online Marketing best practices and so forth.
  7. Search Marketing – The latest news, tips, articles, and discussions in Search Marketing – has over 500 members and it is a Google+ community that was created to bring you the latest in Paid Search, SEO and Social Media and as a platform for open discussions and idea sharing.
  8. PR and Public Relations – A Google+ group for PR professionals both in house and agency. This community has almost 300 members, but only few share content. However, the articles and recommendations you’ll find here will make you join the community dedicated to PR professionals from around the world.
  9. PR & Communications Professionals – Increase networking and facilitate discussions on industry trends. This community has over 260 members, but it is a community very relevant to PR pros so I simply had to feature it on this list. There are many categories with relevant and interesting topics, designed for industry professionals interested in the latest news and discussions about public relations, marketing, branding, social media and more.
  10. Inbound Marketing – all-in-one marketing resources is a community with over 260 members sharing articles and discussing SEO, social media, marketing, PR, etc.

Yes, I know, there is also Internet Marketing – A Network of Internet Marketing Professionals community, with over 1300 members, but I find the content on the other communities to be more interesting, and since it is a list of 10, this community gets a mention here.

Another important thing: yes, you will find some people and articles in more than one community. In the end, you can check these communities and see which one(s) are of more interest to you and then join them.

SOURCE:

About Violeta-Loredana Pascal

Violeta-Loredana Pascal has over 10 years of experience in PR, marketing and communication, and has been running her own PR agency, PRwave INTERNATIONAL for 7 years. She is passionate about reading, blogging and traveling – see Travel – Moments in Time. Follow her on Twitter – @violetaloredana (Romanian and English) and @TravelMoments (English only

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If you’re using social media for marketing, chances are you’re not limiting yourself to just one social network. Facebook and Twitter are the most popular, but other networks, like Google+, LinkedIn, Pinterest, YouTube, and several others also have large followings. With so many networks to choose from, many brands have trouble presenting a unified message across all channels. We don’t want you to fall into that trap, and we’d like to help.

What you want to strive for when working on several social media networks is cohesion. In other words, you want to present a unified identity across the different media you use. There are several ways to do this, covering both online and offline communications. In this post, however, we’re only focusing on a few ways to present a cohesive message on social media.

  • Use the same profile picture or branding across networks One thing most social networks have in common is a profile picture which shows up near the top of your page, and beside your updates, comments, and other posts. Whether you use a logo, a headshot, or some other image, make sure that this picture contains the same branding, whatever network you’re on. This makes it easy for your audience to recognize your posts, no matter which network they see them on.
  • Give your profiles a common theme Using a combination of background image, cover photo, and color palette, you can create a coherent look across social networks, even if you don’t use the exact same images across all of them. Coca-Cola, for example, does a good job with this, ensuring that visitors know they’re connecting with the same brand, no matter where they are. Check out their Facebook, Twitter, and Google+ pages.
  • Post updates on all networks We’re not talking about the overall message (though that’s really important, too), but rather, the updates that you don’t want your fans and followers to miss. Most people favor certain networks over others, and might miss out on your updates if you only share them on one network. When you have important news to share, share it on different networks, so nobody misses out. This isn’t to say every Tweet should be represented also on your Facebook Page. In fact, it shouldn’t. However, major blog posts or announcements should be shared on your different channels as appropriate.
  • Most importantly, know your brand’s voice This is the most abstract of all the tips we’re sharing here, but it is probably the most powerful. Ask yourself what, exactly, your brand stands for. What is your mission? What drives you and your brand? What principles do you stand for? In our case, we certainly talk about our services, but we also want to contribute to our customers by creating educational content and sharing content from other sources that we think would be valuable to our customers and prospects. This sets a tone that is brought through to our social media posts.

When you know what is important to you and your brand, then you can start spreading that message to your audience. Everything you say should revolve around this. The images you share, the stories you tell, the personality you exude – all of these things are rooted in the core beliefs of your brand.

 

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Photo credit: Sean MacEntee

Last year I took a look at Google’s new privacy policy and wasn’t that happy with the way it was presented. Too many links to click, hard to backtrack to make sure you read everything, not sure which parts were boilerplate web safety advice vs. Google’s specific policy, and more. But it got me to thinking, which those who know me rightly find dangerous, about what the future of privacy policies really are. It’s clear that no one is terribly happy with the current situation. Users have no idea what they are agreeing to, privacy advocates complain about the lack of transparency and pillory companies, governments also criticize and regulate companies for their behavior, and companies go to great lengths to obscure what they are doing because they know they will be criticized no matter what. I wonder if there is a better way.

In many ways, privacy comes down to a simple question. Do we need to depend on the free market or on governments? Of course, in the end, it will be a combination of both forces that tell us where we end up, and we should expect to end up in different places in different countries and cultures.

But I think that people have focused on regulation as the only solution, and we’ve overlooked how fraught that approach is with problems:

  • Each government (or consortium of governments, such as the EU) will likely have its own regulations, exposing global businesses to risk and cost, neither of which makes privacy any better.
  • If individual people would prefer different approaches to privacy, a one-size-fits-all regulation is unlikely to allow that.
  • It will take years to have a significant impact, and each technological and business model innovation will affect privacy for years before it is regulated.

I am hopeful that the ability of the public to be educated on privacy perils might allow a free market solution. Perhaps the regulation just needs to ensure transparency of exactly what you are giving up each time you click “accept.” Might companies compete on how they handle your information? Might companies pay consumers for the value of the data that they are parting with? Can companies use privacy as a differentiator?

I don’t know if any of these ideas would work. I just feel like we always act as though regulation of corporate behavior is the only approach. I’d love to explore a free market approach to privacy.

In the end, we all need to admit that we are willing to give up some privacy to get all this cool stuff for free, just as we subject ourselves to advertising for free media. But privacy is too complicated. What’s needed is a company (perhaps even a non-profit one) that can allow privacy to be standardized so that people can decide what they are willing to give up on a company-by-company basis.

Some might argue that it would be very difficult for any company to keep up with all of the different innovations that threaten privacy, but to me that is the point. Companies could always ignore this privacy clearinghouse, but people would have the ability to vote no to any company that did not comply, if they feel strongly about privacy.

Then at least we’d know. Right now, privacy advocates claim that people are asleep about privacy, not because they don’t care, but because it is too complicated. Can these advocates band together and set up a mechanism that simplifies? If so, maybe we’ll find out what privacy is really worth and we’ll find which companies want to compete on privacy.

SOURCE:

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  • Mike Moran
  • Author of the acclaimed book on Internet marketing, Do It Wrong Quickly, on the heels of the best-selling Search Engine Marketing, Inc., Mike Moran led many initiatives on IBM’s Web site for eight years, including IBM’s original search marketing strategy. Mike holds an Advanced Certificate in Market Management Practice from the Royal UK Charter Institute of Marketing, is a Visiting Lecturer at the University of Virginia’s Darden School of Business, and regularly teaches at Rutgers, UC Irvine, and FDU.In addition to his contributions to Biznology, Mike is a regular columnist for Search Engine Guide. He also frequently keynotes conferences worldwide on digital marketing for marketers, public relations specialists, market researchers, and technologists, and serves as a senior strategist for Converseon, a leading digital media marketing consultancy. Mike also worked for IBM for 30 years, rising to the level of Distinguished Engineer. Mike can be reached through his Web site (mikemoran.com).

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Just a sample of some of the decadent desserts you can make and you You Don’t Have to Sacrifice Your Health To Enjoy Dessert  As Often as You Like!

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effective-blogger-outreachBy Chris Abraham

The current catch-all these days for what I do is social media; unfortunately, when what you do is described as social media, people tend to think Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and maybe Google+. My expertise, however, is online community outreach and engagement. Back in 2006 I developed a strategy of blogger outreach that allowed my to reach out to more than just 25 top-tier bloggers by hand over time but to 2,500-5,000 bloggers.

I have always called this long-tail blogger outreach (though I would love your help with choosing a new name for it) because it focuses on the B-Z-list bloggers, the online influencers who are often overlooked by most social media teams at digital agencies.

While I agree that the top-25-50 bloggers do deserve deep, long-term, and personal engagement, spending that sort of time, over time, on “everyone else” would take all the time in the universe. So, what my team and I developed is the equivalent of blogger-brand speed dating. According to Wikipedia:

Speed dating is a formalized matchmaking process or dating system whose purpose is to encourage people to meet a large number of new people” . . . “Men and women are rotated to meet each other over a series of short “dates” usually lasting from 3 to 8 minutes depending on the organization running the event. At the end of each interval, the organizer rings a bell, clinks a glass, or blows a whistle to signal the participants to move on to the next date. At the end of the event participants submit to the organizers a list of who they would like to provide their contact information to. If there is a match, contact information is forwarded to both parties. Contact information cannot be traded during the initial meeting, in order to reduce pressure to accept or reject a suitor to his or her face.”

blogger-outreach2After collecting between 2,000-4,000 blogs that are topically-, geographically-, or demographically-appropriate, preparing a content-laden microsite and penning a very short-and-sweet email message pitch, then I send out those 2K-4K emails, each and every one a speed-date, and wait, real-time, at the Inbox.

Before long, hundreds of email replies stream in. Some aren’t interested, some are game, and others are curious but need more information. Like speed-dating, we’re not interested in the no’s but we’re interested in the yes’s.

Of course we’re courteous and we’re present and we’re always kind — “hugs not horns” I always remind my team — and we’re never anything but earnest and polite — “be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a great battle” — but if they’re not interested, we don’t contact them again. And if they’re very unhappy, we’ll beg their pardon and put them into a Do Not Contact list; otherwise, everyone who replies is taken off the campaign list.

The secret sauce, however, is that this form of speed dating requires email — and email is unreliable. And people are suspicious and busy. And email sometimes doesn’t quite make its way to the Inbox.

BLOG written on  old typewriterSo, a week after the initial email outreach, I send a reminder email, but only to those bloggers who didn’t reply at all. No reply results in a follow-up email.

And it works. Too many practitioners of blogger outreach, email marketing, email outreaches, or even triple-, double-, and single-opt-in mailing lists are just too shy, too feeble in their messaging, for fear that they’ll get hundreds or thousands drinks-in-the-face. Nope, not if you do it right.

If you do it right, you’ll get twice the response you did from your first email. So, for instance, let’s say we emailed 4,000 bloggers and a 1,000 bloggers responded. 250 would have responded to the first email outreach, 500 would have responded to the second outreach, and then 250 would have responded to the final outreach.

Yes, a week after we mail the first follow-up email, we send out a final follow-up and thank you, thanking the blogger (who has yet to email us or reply at all — pretty much radio-silent) for his or her time, for the inconvenience, and also to let the blogger know that he or she is welcome to take advantage of the opportunity when and if he or she gets around to reading and responding to the campaign pitch.

blogger-outreach-largeOur rule is to always be friendly, loving, generous, happy, kind, and even respectfully playful with each and every blogger, even the Grumpy Cats. Never rise to the bait, never fight fire with fire, never engage in snark/irony/sarcasm because the only person who is allowed to be anything but completely charming and gracious is the blogger.

Again, “be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a great battle” — our corporate mantra.

And you know what? If we do everything right, we’ll generally earn a couple-hundred earned media mentions directly shared on the bloggers’ blogs, we’ll also earn secondary mentions through Facebook, Twitter, StumbleUpon, Pinterest, Tumblr, Google+, digg, and even, if we’re lucky, reddit.

If you want to learn more, feel free to take a look at this blogger outreach deck I created for my friends at Sage over on Slideshare.

blogger-outreachAnd here are some links to additional posts I have made about blogger outreach in the past:

Blogger outreach and engagement is much more than social media. It could be seen as content marketing, yes, but it could and should be a communications strategy toward discovering and prospecting new and future influencers.

influencers-blogger-outreachIf you can identify a passion player, someone who is already talking about you, your products and services, or products and services you, too, offer, and you can woo them into becoming citizen brand ambassadors, and if you are their “first kiss,” then you’ll be able to develop a very large pack of proponents and passion-players who will be loyal and will have safely imprinted on your attention, your acknowledgement, and your generosity. To be sure, it’s much easier to prospect for new fans when these fans haven’t been wooed by another than it is to woo them away from a secure brand-attachment.

And, to be honest, every single blogger anywhere close to the top-50 has already been spoken for in a big way; and, generally-speaking, their brand sugardaddies probably have deeper-pockets and are internationally more prestigious that you may well be — so it behooves you to play blogger moneyball: find a large number of very talented bloggers who can personally assist you in your branding goals and bottom-line rather than spending your time and money on a few outrageously-compensated stars, most of whom are too busy and too distracted by an embarrassment of riches to actually give you all the time, attention, and coverage that you, your brand, your products, and your services deserve.

BloggerAnd remember, if you do all of this right, it’ll all be an earned media campaign, meaning you won’t have to pay each and every one of these bloggers to post, to cover, to review, or to promote. That’s not to say this’ll all be free to you — all of this can be expensive, both in terms of client service agency hours as well as in terms of the give, the gift, you pitch the blogger with, be it informational, a product, or a service. And you need to make it good. Unless it’s an offer that can’t be refused — give ’til it hurts — and you just expect a blogger to blog about you “just because” then you’ll always be disappointed.

As you can tell from my mantra, the blogger is always right. I have had clients get all diva about drop shipping the number of review copies of products in the past, telling me that they’ll go bankrupt because they’d need to drop ship 200 books or 39 pairs of glasses, asking me to pick and choose which of the bloggers should receive the gift. It doesn’t work that way. The bloggers have all the leverage. If you don’t make good on your generous offer, each and every blogger has recourse — and we knew they did — and it’s their blog! And their tweets and Facebook posts and their Tumblr and Pinterest and reddit and everywhere else.

But that never happens. Give ’til it hurts, understanding that better I do my job and the better and more generous my pitch is, the more bloggers will want to engage, thereby resulting in possibly hundreds and hundreds of requests, based on an outreach of 4,000 blogs — it’s only math. I would hate to hit the jackpot on behalf of a client only to find out that I have “bankrupted” them with my success success (and the client is never bankrupt, the client is generally just cheap with a tendency to exaggerate, though this had only happened a couple times in the last 7 years).

So, long-tail blogger outreach is an amazing platform to both discover and engage with a multitude of natural allies and the people who are already talking about you, and giving them all the tools, the copy, the content, the gifts, and the impetus to share stuff about you, as earned media mentions, in very short-order, all over the Internet (an entire campaign only takes around six-weeks, total). It also allows you to harvest all of the bloggers game enough to mention you and your goodies into your inner-most, inner-most, your sanctum sanctorum, where you can personally grow your relationship with them now and groom them into the future — build up your own Guy Kawasaki, Om Malik, and Robert Scoble prospected and recruited and from the bush leagues or from “high school.”

I didn’t expect this post to be so long, but I guess I had a lot to share. Do you consider what I am doing with blogger outreach to be “social media?” What do you think about the discipline? The theory of “everyone”? The concept of flirting with bloggers en masse and engaging with them in a very quick “yes/no” speed-dating scenario? Do you think it is worthwhile to reach out to thousands of bloggers — all the way down to “nobody” — instead or in addition to the top blogger celebrities? Let me know what you think in the comments. I am very curious as to what you think and would love to tweak my methods, evolving it over time. Thanks in advance!

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Last month, I wrote about how SEO is not just the domain of consultants. Rather, every person in digital media production needs to know how their work affects search effectiveness. If SEO is seen not as a well-kept secret by the few SEO consultants, but as a vital skill for everyone, organizations will be much more effective in producing findable content for the target audience, especially in the age of Google Panda. Thing is, if you rely on Google to discover your content and give it the value it deserves, you will often be disappointed. You also need to build a network of links into your content, which tell Google about the relative importance of the content in the context of other related content. In the age of Google Penguin, this can’t be an artificial process performed by SEO consultants. It needs to be built into the publishing process. This means coordinating your publishing efforts with other internal content strategists, with paid search leads, media relations managers, and especially community managers. Giving these folks the SEO skills they need to help promote your content is just as important as building the content right in the first place.

Panda and Penguin

Panda and Penguin

Paid Search Leads

You would think that in-house SEOs have strong connections with their counterparts who run paid search. In my experience, this is rare. Most of my counterparts in the B2B tech space don’t even sit in the same division with their paid search leads. Yet we know that the two roles need to collaborate closely.

The consensus among experts in both paid and organic is that 1+1 =3, meaning that you get much more value if you buy the words and point to the pages for which you rank organically. Several studies showed that users tend to click organic listings up to 30 percent more often if there is a paid listing for the same page on the search engine results page (SERP). On the other hand, if the paid listing points to a different page than the organic ranking page, it just confuses prospects.

It is not hard to train paid search leads to work with their organic counterparts. You certainly don’t have to convince them of the importance of search marketing. And even the mechanics are similar. In paid, you rank against the other ads on a SERP based, in part, on the page’s quality score. The quality score criteria are similar to what it takes for a page to rank organically. Another thing that can help you climb the rankings in paid ads is the quality of the “creative”–the text and images around the link that entice clicks. If a paid listing has high click through rates (CTR), it will ascend the paid rankings all things considered, similar to organic. But if the landing experience has a high bounce rate, it will descend the rankings, again similar to organic.

The main difference between the two roles is bid and budget management, which is beyond the scope of this article. But the words that the paid search person bids on, the creative she uses, and the landing page she designates can all be improved if she understands SEO and collaborates with her organic counterpart.

Media Relations Managers

It has long been a dream of enterprise SEOs to be able to train their media relations colleagues in SEO, and thereby to maximize opportunities to build links. At minimum, press releases and other media relations assets need to use the right keywords and URLs they list within them. This might be easy for a small company. But enterprise SEOs struggle with this mightily. I lost count of the press releases that used only branded words and pointed only to the home page.

Every time a media relations manager publishes a press release without the right keywords or URLs within them, it is a missed opportunity to build links. Of course, the press release itself carries some link juice (contrary to Matt Cutts’ December statements). But that is of minimal consequence compared to a reputable journalist or blogger writing an article or post with the link inside of it. In the age of Penguin, links are only valuable to the extent that the domain of the linker is strong. Getting an influencer to link to your page can improve your ranking by several slots in one day.

In my experience, the biggest barrier to training media relations professionals in SEO is a disdain for marketing “chest thumping.” So Job One is convincing them that the pages you want them to link to from within their press releases are authentic, transparent, accurate, and clear. Above all, you need to convince them that they are free of hyperbole. Not coincidentally, these are some of the qualities that can help your content rank better for Google’s Panda algorithm.

Community Managers

Community managers, also known as social business managers, constitute a new role within marketing and communications. Part blog editor, part influencer relations manager, part social media expert, these folks are on the vanguard of digital. As I recently wrote on WritingforDigital, search and social are interrelated. With the advent of the new Facebook Social Graph, and the ascendency of Google+, they are, in fact, converging. I expect within the next three years that the roles of SEO, content strategist, and community manager will be functionally interchangeable.

I normally have no difficulty explaining to these folks the importance of SEO. More often than not, they come to me asking for advice on how to make their blog posts rank better. But we can’t take for granted that their blog authors are using the right keywords and URLs in their posts, or that the shortened links in tweets and Facebook posts stem from the right canonical URLs. And we need to work together to ensure that their blog authors are registered with Google+, so they can begin accruing Author Rank and we can get their pictures in SERP snippets. Consequently, I’m in almost daily conversations with dozens of community managers. I consider them to be some of my closest colleagues. Enterprise SEOs would do well to follow my example.

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There are a lot of rumors going around about the proper ways to optimize your Facebook fan page for the search engines (SEO). Some people suggest using keywords in the filenames of your uploads, and others say you need to have every URL you own linked to your fan page. If you’re anything like me, you don’t particularly have time to sit around and search for a tip here and a tip there, only to find out weeks later that it did you no good.

This post provides a few more tips on optimizing your Facebook page for SEO right now.

Choose the best name for your Facebook page

1This may sound like a no-brainer. However, it’s the most basic step when it comes to optimizing your brand on Facebook, and is also the most important.

There is always the temptation to stuff your fan page name with tons of keywords, like “Bob’s Bakery – Muffins, Bagels, Cookies, Breads – Catering & Events.” In actuality, having a name like this can hurt your viral growth rate inside Facebook. If you appear too spammy, your fans will be less likely to engage with your page, let alone share posts and updates with their friends. In fact, people can even hide your updates from their news feed – the horror!

Don’t be too generic, either. Facebook’s intent behind fan pages is that they represent real businesses, brands, personalities, etc. By choosing something too generic, like Travel, Sports, Fishing, etc., you run the risk of Facebook shutting down your ability to post updates and reach out to new fans.

Quick tip: The first word in your fan page title is given the most weight by Google.

 

Create a custom fan page vanity URL

Use a brief 140-character description for your fan page so your whole message displays in the search engine’s snippet

2After your fan page has 25 Likes, Facebook gives you the ability to create a unique URL (or usernames as Facebook calls them) for the page. Because URLs are heavily weighted by search engines, it is vital that your fan page URL reflects an aspect of your business.

If, by some misalignment in the stars, you find that another fan page has claimed your business’ name already, make sure to include what your business is about in the URL. You can check out some different username options Facebook offers before selecting your one for your fan page.

Use keywords in strategic locations on your fan page

3Just like traditional websites, keyword optimization is the most fundamental form of on-site SEO. The most important pieces to pay attention to are the About section, Mission, and Company Description, since these areas are actually pulled from your fan page as SEO elements.

Here is an example of how a search engine would index your page:

SEO Title = Your fan page name
Meta Description = Fan page name + the About section of your page
H1 = Your fan page name

To optimize your page for local searches, it is very important to include your address, city, state, and zip. For product-related searches, the Company Overview, Mission, and Products fields should be filled in with your appropriate information.

Quick tip: You may want to consider using a brief 140-character description for your fan page — perhaps similar to your website’s metadata — so your whole message displays in the search engine’s snippet.

Include your phone number and address

4As surprising as it sounds, there are a lot of businesses out there that don’t include this type of info on their fan page. As a majority of your sales may be from online traffic, it can appear to be not quite so important for you to include. But remember, indexing your brand for local search results is crucial to growing your Facebook page.

In addition, Google places higher importance on pages with specific information like your business’s phone number and address. So, pages that include this type of data can effectively increase your brand’s overall SEO.

Backlink to your fan page on existing channels

5The more inbound links to your page, the more authoritative your page is according to Google, and you will be ranked higher. That is why it is very important to bloggers when they have their content linked to from other websites, blogs, etc.

This same principle applies to your Facebook fan page. So, where it is appropriate, include a link to your fan page from your other digital channels, like your website, blog, and Twitter profile.

Optimize Facebook fan page status updates

6When posting updates to your Facebook wall, remember that the first 18 characters of a Facebook post serve as the meta description. So, take advantage of the option when Facebook prompts you to “Write something…” since that text will be considered the SEO title for that update. Including direct links to your small business website in your updates is also a good practice to follow.

Quick tip: Just like your fan page’s name, Google places a higher importance on the first word of your update, so you may want to consider making that a keyword.

SEO for Facebook Notes

7Facebook Notes is something that has been underutilized. When used appropriately, Facebook Notes can provide your fan page with an effective way at increasing your overall SEO. The SEO elements pulled in from Facebook Notes are:

SEO Title = the title of your note
Meta data = Your fan page name wrote a note titled, your note’s title

Facebook Notes gives your page the ability to create multiple “pages” underneath the main fan page. Notes are also a good way to expand on special offers or events that your business is hosting and have them indexed in search engines.

(A note about Notes: Facebook Notes were sort of put out to pasture in late 2001, early 2012 with the advent of Timeline and the new rule that status updates can run as long as 63,206 characters, or about 9,000 words. They’re still there; just follow this convention: https://www.facebook.com/jdlasica/notes)

Bottom line for Facebook fan page SEO

Don’t forget that the overarching objective of Facebook SEO is adding to the value of your overall brand. It is important to pay attention to the comparison between raw traffic and engagement level.

While using the methods above can help boost your search engine results page ranking, the most crucial part is that it coincides with an awesome product and incredible engagement to grow your following.

 

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Nathan Latka is the CEO and co-founder of Heyo.com. This article appeared at SEOmoz. SEOmoz is not affil­i­ated with Socialmedia.biz. SEO­moz pro­vides the Web’s best SEO tools and resources.

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